Are You Willing to Relocate for a Job?

When you work with a recruitment agency, you might be asked whether you are willing to relocate for a position. This is a big decision to make, as it would mean uprooting your whole life. However, if the right position came up, you might be willing to do anything to get it.

Have a serious think about whether you would be willing to relocate and, if so, how far you would be willing to go. It would be good if you could give your recruitment consultant some specifics, so that this can go onto your records. For example, you might be willing to relocate within 100 miles for your ideal job. Something else to think about is whether you would be able or willing to commute. Sometimes this can be a good in between option, allowing you to access more positions, but without having to worry about moving home and location.

What to Look for in a Recruitment Consultant

Working with a recruitment consultant can help you to find new job opportunities, but it can also be quite a lot of work to sign up with the agencies. If they want to meet you in person, sign paperwork and generally get to know you a little better, then this is inevitably going to take time. There is no point in job hunting without any real prospects, so it’s important you find the right recruitment consultant before you put in the effort.

Look at the kinds of jobs they have available on their website to give you an idea about positions they recruit for. You can also speak to recruitment consultants on the phone first – many will want to have a telephone interview first to make sure you are the kind of candidate they want as well. If you feel you make a good connection, they proceed with the relationship and see if you can meet face to face.

Making Sensible Career Decisions in Your 20s

Career decisions are never easy, especially when you are young and still unsure about what you ultimately want to do. You need to lay solid foundations for any career and by the end of your 20s, it’s very beneficial to have a good idea of the field you want to be working in during your later career.

You don’t need to have a set plan. Most people who are now in their 20s will be working until they are in their 70s, so there is a lot of time to change your mind! It is a good idea to have something to aim for and the build up a good job history, though. People who have done nothing related to their chosen career path could struggle in future as the competition for the best positions becomes fierce. Put together a career action plan and have some clear goals, both short term and long term.

Finding Your First Job After University

When you finish university or college, the next step is to find yourself your first real job. This is a major transitional phase for your career, as you will be going from studying full time and maybe having a part-time job to earn some spending money, to working in a full-time role that is probably around 37-40 hours a week.

Don’t be put off by the fact that it is a major change. Many people will be looking for graduates and actually, it won’t necessarily matter what subject your degree is in. Make sure your CV is up to scratch and begin sending it to recruitment agencies to see what they can offer you.

Whilst you shouldn’t necessarily just take the first job you are offered, you also shouldn’t be put off by taking a more junior role. Many graduates think too much about the bigger picture and look for jobs that meet with all their career dreams and that they could see themselves doing forever. This is unrealistic. Find a job, get some experience and then re-evaluate your options in a year’s time if you want to.

Going Back From Self-Employment in to an Employed Role

Many of us dream about running our own business, but often the reality of it is far from the dream we had in mind. Businesses can go wrong for a number of reasons and if you are the business owner then you will most likely feel the stress and pressure more than anyone else.

If you have been self-employed or owned your own business and feel it is time to go back to employment you may find the transition period very hard.

Being employed will most likely mean that you have a boss that you report to. You will be given a job role and either a salary or commission based structure of pay and will have to work certain hours to achieve this. Working for yourself takes discipline but so does working for someone else and you not only have yourself to answer to but possibly a manager or business owner.

 

Starting Your Own Business

Starting your own business can be daunting. You may worry about how you are going to attract customers and get the work and if you are going to be able to make money. If you have to buy stock or employ staff from the offset then this will also be a concern, especially if you have had to take out a loan to get you off the ground.

When starting your own business, marketing is essential. You need to be able to promote your company in a cost effective way and ideally monitor which marketing avenue is most successful for you.

When you have a good idea of what you want your business to do and have created a business plan, then you need to start to think about company names and logos. Having a business card, flyers or even just a logo can give your customers more confidence to buy from you.